Like many love affairs with the KZN Midlands, ours started, many years ago, with a weekend getaway, followed by many more.
Then, towards the end of 2016, my husband and I started thinking…. seeing we love the area so much, why not rent something in Nottingham Road or Rosetta at which to spend weekends to see if we liked it enough to live in the Midlands.

Three months into our six months in Rosetta we faced our fourth retrenchment process in as many years. We survived it, but decided it was time for a Plan B. There was no chance we were going to waste any more energy worrying about whether or not we would have jobs to enable us to afford to stay in Durban.
The next thing we knew we had bought a piece of land in Nottingham Road and built a tiny wooden cabin, which has been our weekend refuge for the past year.

Nerissa Card, in her happy place

Thank goodness we did, because yet another S189 notice of retrenchment crossed my desk in October last year and, on December 15, I was retrenched from the mainstream media industry after 32 years.
I wasn’t the only journalist to have to put down their pen and I certainly won’t be the last. The future of mainstream print media gets bleaker by the year.
I do, however, believe that there is a future for print media, but it doesn’t lie in mainstream. It lies in community newspapers like the Meander Chronicle, so I was delighted to be asked to contribute the story of our love affair with the Midlands and how we came to be here for this month’s edition.
As I write this, we are packing up our lives in Durban and getting ready to move to our little wooden house at the end of February to start our new lives in the country.

What we will do remains to be seen, but I hope you, the Chronicle’s loyal readers, will join us on our journey. You never know, Phil and Caro might just ask me for a further contribution to what I think is a fabulous title with endless possibilities.
Nerissa